What Is God’s Job Function?

Genesis 2.2 says, “And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done.”

But, Jesus told us that the Father never stopped working. In John 5.17, Jesus said, “My Father is working until now, and I am working.”

So, God works. Therefore, God has a job.

What is God’s job function?

Why is God working?

What is God trying to accomplish with his work.

To put it simply, God’s job function is to bring life out of death.

Everything that God does is focused on this one thing – bringing life out of death. God never brings death to anyone. Only life.

Just look at what Jesus said in John 5.19-29 immediately after he said that Father is working and so is he.

“Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing his own accord, but only what he sees the Father doing. For whatever the Father does, that the Son does likewise. For the Father  loves the Son and shows him all that he himself is doing. And greater works than these will he show him, so that you may marvel. For as the Father raises the dead and gives them life, so also the Son gives life to whom he will.” – John 5.19-21

The Father gives life to the dead. And so does Jesus. Therefore, Acts 10.38 says, “He went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him.” Matthew 4.23 says, “And he went through all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom and healing every disease and every affliction among the people.” Mark 1.34 says, “And he healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons.” Luke 4.40 says, “Now when the sun was setting, all those who had any who were sick with various diseases brought them to him, and he laid his hands on every one of them and healed them.” Everywhere Jesus went in the gospels he brought life to those that were sick because that is what he saw the Father doing.

Back to John 5.

“For the Father judges no one, but has given all judgment to the Son, that all may honor the Son, just as they honor the Father. Whoever does honor the Son does honor the Father who sent him. Truly, truly, I say to you, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life. He does not come into judgment, but has passed from death to life.” – John 5.22-24

Here again Jesus stresses that God causes things to move from death to life. This is how God works. Bringing life from death is God’s job function. Jesus says this is the word he is speaking and everyone who hears it will have eternal life. In other words, they will know that God and that his job function is bring life from death.  Later in John 12.49-50, Jesus explicitly stated this when he said, “For I have not spoken on my own authority, but the Father who sent me has himself given me a commandment – what to say and what to speak. And I know that his commandment is eternal life. What I say, therefore, I say as the Father told me.” Jesus only spoke life because life is the only thing God speaks. God is always calling life out of death.

Back to John 5.

“Truly, truly, I say to you, an hour is coming and is now here, when the dead will hear the voice of the Son of God, and those who hear will live. For as the Father has life in himself, so he has granted the Son also to have life in himself. And he has given him authority to execute judgment, because he is the Son of Man. Do not marvel at this, for an hour is coming when all who are in the tombs will hear his voice and come out, those who have done good to the resurrection of life, and those who have done evil to the resurrection of judgment.” – John 5.25-29

The hour that was coming that Jesus referred to was his crucifixion. At the crucifixion of Jesus, the dead would hear the voice of the Son of God and come to life. All those in the tombs would hear the voice of the Son of God, come out of the tombs and receive the resurrection of life. The Bible, Christian faith, and Christian tradition make clear that if there is anything that reveals God it is the cross, where God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself, which is to say bringing life out of death. So, here again we see God’s job function – bringing life out of death.

What else did Jesus say about the hour of his crucifixion?

“The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.” – John 12.23-24

So, a seed dies and bears fruit. Life comes out of death. When Jesus died he was like a seed planted in the ground that God brought life out of.

But, what do we know about seeds?

Let’s go all the way back to creation, back to Genesis 1.11-12, which says, “Let the earth sprout vegetation, plants yielding seed, and fruit trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, plants yielding seed according to their own kinds, and trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind.”

Seeds can only bear according to their kind. That is, seeds can only produce what is inside of them. Nothing else. An apple seed cannot produce an orange tree.

What was in Jesus?

“For as the Father has life in himself, so he has granted the Son also to have life in himself.” – John 5.26

The Father and the Son both have life in them. Life is in their seed. Therefore, they can only produce life. They cannot produce death because then their seed would be producing not according to their own kind but some other kind. The seed must die before it can bear what it is carrying inside of it. So, Jesus, the Son of God, had to die to bring forth life. Again, we are confronted with God’s work and his job function.

In fact, this is the theme of the creation story in Genesis 1. Remember, God was at work when he created.

What did God do?

Genesis 1.2 says, “The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep.”

What does that mean?

The earth was dead.

But, then God called forth light, water, and land on days one, two, and three. Then, God said, “Let the earth sprout vegetation.”

Life.

Then God made the waters to swarm with living creatures and the heavens with birds.

More life.

Then God caused the earth to bring forth living creatures.

More life.

Then God created mankind in his own image.

More life.

Life, more life, more life, and more life. All from a dead earth.

Bring life out of death was what God did in the beginning, what God in the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, what God is still doing today, and what God will always be doing.

God brings life and never death.

This what a crucified God reveals to us. Jurgen Moltmann said it this way in The Crucified God:

“The death of Christ cannot only come to fruition in an existentialist interpretation, in the ability of the believer to die in peace, important though that may be. The crucified Christ must be thought of as the origin of creation and the embodiment of the eschatology of being. In the cross of his Son, God took upon himself not only death, so that man might be able to die comforted with the certainty that even death could not separate him from God, but still more, in order to make the crucified Christ the ground of his new creation, in which death itself is swallowed up in the victory of life and there will be ‘no sorrow, no crying, and no more tears.'”

“Like the metaphysics of finite being, the theology of the cross sees all creatures subject to transitoriness and nothingness. But because it does not arise in this context, but sees nothingness itself done away with in the being of God, who in the death of Jesus has revealed himself and constituted himself in nothingness, it changes the general impression of the transitoriness of all things into the prospect of the hope and liberation of all things. ‘For the creation was subjected to nothingness, not of its own will but by the will of him who subjected it in hope’ (Rom. 8.20). Thus the metaphysical longing of all that is transitory for intransitoriness and of all that is finite for infinity undergoes an eschatological transformation and is taken up into the hope of freedom and the sons of God and the freedom of the new creation that does not pass away. Anyone who says ‘resurrection of the dead’ says ‘God’ (Barth). On the other hand, anyone who says ‘God’ and does not hope for the resurrection of the dead and a new creation from the righteousness of God, has not said ‘God’. What other belief in God can be held by those who are ‘dead’ unless it is ‘resurrection faith’?”

Indeed.

To say that life from death is to say God. That is God’s work and job function.

But, if you say God and cling to hell, eternal conscious torment, eternal burning and suffering, then you are not actual saying God. You are saying death. And, Satan is the one with that power (Hebrews 2.14-15).

We must remember that we all were once dead. Some may even still be dead. But, to proclaim God, to proclaim Christian faith, to proclaim resurrection faith is to say that I once was dead but now I am alive.

“And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience – among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind. But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ – by grace you have been saved – and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.” – Ephesians 2.10

Once again, God brings life to dead. This is his work. It is God’s job function. We, all humankind, are his workmanship, his masterpiece.

Job’s Three Daughters: From Death to Life

TODAY’S READING: JOB 39-42

Job has heard God and seen the error of his ways. He sees that God is far more wonderful than he ever imagined. Job now knows that God is working good, and not evil, for him.

What was the result of Job’s understanding God’s goodness?

Job’s end was better than his beginning. God doubled Job’s possessions. And, God gave Job 10 children to replace the 10 children that Satan had killed.

Just like before, Job had seven sons and three daughters. But, it is interesting that of the 20 children Job had that we are only given the names of the second set of three daughters. Not only are we given their names but we are told there were no women so beautiful as them and that Job gave them an inheritance with their brothers.

Given that many believe Job is the oldest book of the Bible and the patriarchal culture it would come from, it is quite amazing that we are only given names for the daughters and they received an inheritance with their brothers. Therefore, I believe this shows we should pay special attention to these daughters.

JEMIMAH

According to several sources, the name Jemimah means dove. But, another source says that it sort of looks like the Hebrew word for seas (mayim). Therefore, in addition to dove, Jemimah could mean “she who acts like the sea.”

What does the sea act like?

It is turbulent and chaotic. It is always churning and roaring. This seems to be an apt description of Job through most of this book. And, it is an apt description for all of us at some point in our lives.

But, in the creation of Genesis, God gathers the seas so that the dry land could appear. This is a picture of the resurrection of Jesus. And, in that account of creation, we read the Holy Spirit, often pictured as a dove in scripture, was hovering above the seas.

In Mark4 :35-41, Jesus and the disciples were in a boat crossing the sea when a stormed picked up. The sea was crashing into the boat and the disciples feared they were going to die. Jesus spoke to the wind and the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the disciples said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

Jemimah then represents Jesus calming the stormy thoughts, thoughts that are chaotic and turbulent, we have about God.

KEZIAH

The name Keziah derives from the Hebrew word qasa. Virtually all the forms of qasa have to do with an abrupt or severe ending. Qasa means to remove by cutting off. Therefore, the name Keziah may mean “it is done” or “it is finished.”

What is finished?

For Job, his view of God as good and evil, someone he could argue and content with, was cut off when he heard the words of Elihu, a picture of Jesus, and then both heard the words of God and saw God as he truly is.

In John 19:30, “It is finished” were the last words of Jesus on the cross before he bowed his head and gave up his spirit. Jesus had finished his work to destroy the works of Satan, the one troubles our thoughts, and the power of sin in our lives.

Jesus finished that work on the cross. His work becomes true in us when we die with him in baptism, reckoning ourselves dead to sin and the old way of life.

KEREN-HAPPUCH

The name Keren-happuch is made up of two words. Keren is the Hebrew word for horn. Happuch carries the meaning of antimony in the Bible. Therefore, one meaning of the name is the horn of antimony.

What is antimony?

Antimony was a mineral that could be crushed or pulverized for use in medicines and cosmetics. Therefore, antimony was an agent of healing and beautifying. And, that the name means the horn of antimony means the power of healing and beautifying.

Job’s pride and self-righteousness had been crushed and pulverized after he heard and saw God. Then, despite the treatment from his friends, Job was able to pray for them that God would not deal with them according to their folly. Job’s prayer brought healing and beautification to the lives of his friends.

This reminds me of what Paul said in 2 Corinthians 4:7-12.

“But we have this treasure in jars of clay, to show that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies. For we who live are always being given over to death for Jesus’ sake, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh. So death is at work in us, but life in you.”

The stormy thoughts have been calmed. The cross has performed its perfect work, crucifying the old man of sin. And, now there is the filling of the body with the Spirit of healing and beautifying.

So, we see Job’s three daughters as a picture of the work done in Job and the work that Jesus does in us so that we can be the light of the world, participating in Jesus’ ministry of reconciliation.

And, why three daughters?

Well, three is the period of time between death and life. The three daughters symbolize what happens to us as we go from death to life.