Do You Believe the Bible Is the Word of God?

Do you the believe the Bible is “the word of God?”

I don’t.

I believe holding the Bible as “the word of God” is a very subtle form of idolatry. because we are putting a book before the actual Word of God, Jesus Christ. Anything we put before God, before Jesus, becomes an idol. And, idolatry is not worship in spirit and in truth.

Let me show you what I mean.

“In the beginning was THE BIBLE, and the THE BIBLE was with God, and THE BIBLE was God.” – John 1:1

Is that what it is says?

No.

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. HE (a person) was in the beginning with God.”

So, the Word of God is a he, a person.

“And THE BIBLE continued to increase.” – Acts 6:7

“But THE BIBLE increased and multiplied.” – Acts 12:24

“And THE BIBLE was spreading throughout the whole region.” – Acts 13:49

“So THE BIBLE continued to increase and prevail mightily.” – Acts 18:20

Is that what any of these scriptures say?

No.

They all the say the “word of God” or the “word of the Lord.” Clearly, the Bible is not what Luke has in mind. Jesus Christ, the word of God, continued to increase, multiply, spread and prevail. I only picked the most obvious scriptures in Acts to show you this. Once you have seen the most obvious ones, it’s easier to see all the others refer to Jesus too.

“But it is not as though THE BIBLE has failed.” – Romans 9:6

“So faith comes from hearing, and hearing through THE BIBLE.” Romans 10:17

Is that what Paul means in these verses?

No.

It’s the word of God, the word of Christ, Jesus Christ, that has not failed and through whom faith comes by hearing.

“Of which I became a minister according to the stewardship from God that was given to me for you, to make THE BIBLE fully known.” – Colossians 1:25

Is the Bible what Paul came to make known?

No.

Paul came to preach Jesus Christ, the word of God, and him crucified. He said that was all he wanted to know among us.

“And we also thank God constantly for this, that when you received THE BIBLE, which you heard from us, you accepted it not as the word of men, but as what is really is, THE BIBLE, which is at work in you believers.” – 1 Thessalonions 1:13

Is Paul saying these people received the Bible and the Bible is at work in them?

No.

Ironically, the Bible is the word of men, although inspired by God. So, of course Paul wasn’t constantly in thanks that people had received the Bible. The Bible didn’t even exist at that time, nor could many even afford a copy of the scriptures or read them. They received the word of God, Jesus Christ, and Jesus Christ is at work in them.

“But the THE BIBLE is not bound.” – 2 Timothy 2:9

Is the Bible bound?

Why, yes it is.

The end of Revelation says that we should add nothing to or take anything away from the book. No one is adding to the Bible anymore. It is bound. But, the word of God, Jesus Christ, is not bound. We saw in Acts that he is increasing, spreading, multiplying, prevailing. And the gospel of John says that if every act of Jesus were to be recorded all the books in the world could not contain them.

“For THE BIBLE is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And no creature is hidden from HIS (a person) sight.” – Hebrews 4:12-13

Is the Bible living and active?

No.

The word of God, Jesus Christ, is living and active. He divides soul from spirit within us. No creature is hidden from HIS sight. The Bible is not looking into the heart of every creature.

“By faith we understand that the universe was made by THE BIBLE, so that what is seen was not made out of things that are visible.” – Hebrew 11:3

Did the Bible make the universe?

No.

Is the Bible invisible?

No.

The Bible did not make the universe. Yes, the Bible is visible. Therefore, it could not have been the invisible thing that made the things that are seen.

The word of God, Jesus Christ, made the universe. Read John 1 and Colossians 1.

“Since you have been born again, not of persihable seed but of imperishable, through the living and abiding BIBLE.” – 1 Peter 1:23

Are you born again by the Bible?

No.

Is the Bible the imperishable seed that was planted in the ground to bring new life?

No.

The word of God, Jesus Christ, is the grain of wheat, the imperishable seed, planted in the ground that sprang up to new life. (John 12:24) Jesus Christ is the living and abiding word of God.

“And the earth was formed out of water and through the water by THE BIBLE.” – 2 Peter 3:5

Did the Bible form the earth?

No.

The word of God, Jesus Christ, formed the earth. He made everything.

These are just the most obvious places where the word of God is clearly not the Bible. The word of God is Jesus Christ, a person. But, once you have seen the obvious places, you will be able to see Jesus as “the word” in all the other places too.

When you see that in the New Testament, then you should do a study in the Old Testament on “the word of the Lord.” You will notice that many of the uses of that phrase refer to a person.

The Bible calls itself not the word of God but the scriptures. And, so does Jesus.

Jesus said in John 5:39-40, “You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life.”

Like the Jews Jesus was speaking to, you can search the scriptures all you want to find life. But, you won’t find life in the scriptures. The scriptures, the Bible, is simply a witness to Jesus, the true word of God, true life. We have to go to him for life. In fact, we can’t even understand the scriptures without his life, the Holy Spirit, in us and teaching us. The Holy Spirit brings to our remembrance everything that Jesus said. The Holy Spirit takes the dead letters and brings them to life (2 Corinthians 3).

Throughout scripture, God states that he wants people to listen to his voice, his word, Jesus Christ. He never stated that he wanted people to listen to a written book.

I posted the above on Facebook more than one year ago. The following is my reply to a comment on my Facebook post. The comment stated that there was a difference between “the word of God incarnate” and “the word of God written.”

Let’s assume that trusted theologians for centuries have made the distinction between “the word of God incarnate” and “the word of God written.” Assuming that, I would respectfully disagree with them.

For the obvious reason that no one knew the word of God was Jesus until he came, I can only compare what the New Testament says about, as you say, “the word of God incarnate” and the “word of God written.”

I already showed in my post that the New Testament says the “word of God” is a person, Jesus Christ. Also, I said in my post that God has always desired a people that would listen to his voice. It is a voice that speaks or proclaims a word. Voices are listened to and heard, hence Jesus’ statement that those who knew him would know his voice.

The exact phrase “word of God” appears 44 times in the Bible.

Of those, 9 times the “word of God” was heard (Luke 5:1, 5:21, 11:28, John 8:47, Acts 13:5), received (Acts 8:14, 11:1, 1 Thessalonians 2:13), or accepted (1 Thessalonians 2:13). I included received and accepted because the vast majority of anyone at that time would have received or accepted whatever the word of God is by hearing as they could not read.

Of those, 8 times the “word of God” was taught (Acts 18:11), proclaimed (Acts 13:5, Acts 17:13), preached (Acts 6:2), spoken (Acts 4:31, Acts 13:46, Hebrews 13:7) or uttered (John 3:34).

Therefore, if just over one-third of the uses of the exact phrase “word of God” are used in the context of hearing or speaking. then God wants us to hear his voice.

So, what about the “word of God written?”

Is that even a thing?

Well, what does the Bible say about itself?

Over and over, the Bible refers to what is written as the scriptures. The word scripture(s) is used 51 times.

Of those, 3 times the scripture is specifically referred to as being read. Not one time is the “word of God” referred to as being read.

Of those, 27 times the scripture is mentioned in the context of being fulfilled or believed. Therefore, more than half the uses of “scripture,” what is written, are to show that the true “word of God,” Jesus, fulfilled what had been written. In this way, what was written, the scripture, is a shadow of the reality, the true word of God, Jesus Christ. The scriptures are no more the word of God than any of the other Old Testament types and shadows – Joseph, Joshua, the offerings, the tabernacle, etc. – are the word of God in some other form. Just like all the types and shadows in the Old Testament, the scriptures are a witness to Jesus Christ, the word of God.

Of those, 8 times the scriptures are mentioned in the context of searching/examining or reasoning/showing/encouraging. The scriptures were used, not to prove that they were the word of God, but to prove that Jesus Christ indeed is the word of God.

Of those, 3 times Jesus is said to interpret or open the scriptures. Jesus took what was written and translated it into the actual word of God for the disciples. He showed them where he, the word of God, was (and wasn’t) in the scriptures.

The scriptures, the Bible, never call themselves the word of God

Muddling the word of God, Jesus Christ, with the scriptures, the Bible, the written word, is actually what calls the whole thing into question and has people confused.

In some manner, Jesus Christ did pit himself against the scriptures, what was written. In the sermon on mount, he repeatedly said, “You have heard it said…but I say to you.” Also, look through the gospels and you will see that Jesus never called the Law “his law” or “his Father’s law.” He almost always said “your law” or “their law.”

You mention Moses and the prophets speaking the “word of God.” Yes, they did. But, they had a veiled view of God. They did not see him clearly. Therefore, they could not write about him clearly. This is why Moses prophesied in Deuteronomy 18:15-18 about God raising up another prophet, Jesus Christ, that Israel would listen to (not read, and isn’t interesting that we don’t have a single thing written from the most important person in the world).

But, Jesus himself said that John the Baptist was the greatest man of the old covenant, but even he was the least in the kingdom of God.

Why?

Because he was not born again, filled, by the Holy Spirit the way we are. This is important because 2 Timothy 3:16 says that scripture is God-breathed. But, do you know what else is God-breathed? Every person is filled with the Holy Spirit, God-breathed as it were. Each human being is as inspired as the scriptures. Therefore, Paul says in 2 Corinthians 3 that we are living letters as opposed to the dead letters of the old covenant scriptures that can only point to life when read by the Spirit within us.

Something that is God-breathed contains the Spirit, but it is clearly not the Spirit. Just as the Bible witnesses to, or contains, Jesus, but it is not the Word of God. Without this understanding we get a lot of twisted ideas about God and Jesus.

As for making the book less “sacred,” or less important, you know me better than that. Writing about the Bible every day for an entire year, as I have on this blog, cannot be considered making the book less sacred or less important.

But, we need a right understanding of what it is and what it isn’t. We need to put the Bible and Jesus Christ in their rightful places.

What Is the Key to Understanding the Bible Correctly?

My wife and I drove to Chicago the other day. We had an interesting conversation about Christianity, the Bible, and faith during the drive. This conversation started with my wife saying she was over the Bible. Even though she had read it since she was a teenager, she was done with it. She was tired of how people were reading it and the meanings the were drawing from it. I completely understood what she was saying because I have even felt that way somewhat recently.

What did she mean?

Basically, people use the Bible to support what they already believe.

The Bible has been used to support capitalism and socialism.

The Bible has been used to support slavery and freedom.

The Bible has been used to support monogamy and bigamy.

The Bible has been used to support complementarianism and egalitarianism.

The Bible has been used to support war and non-violence.

The Bible has been used to support heterosexuality and homosexuality.

The Bible has been used to support Jews and Israel and to hate Jews and Israel.

The Bible has been used to support white supremacy and black liberation.

Pretty much whatever idea or ideology people have had they have found a way for the Bible to support.

What is going on here?

How are people able to do this?

They read the Bible literally.

They read a verse, a passage, or even just part of a verse and claim that these words literally support what they already believe no matter what the context of the verse says. And, even if the context does support their idea or ideology, they only take the text at literal, face value.

This is a significant problem.

I cannot stress how big of a problem this is.

So, what is the key to reading the Bible correctly?

Jesus gave us two commandments that perfectly sum up how we should read the Bible.

Jesus said, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And the second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” (Matthew 22.37-39)

In order to understand the Bible correctly, your reading of it must be grounded and rooted in love. If love is not the very foundation of every single thought you have regarding the Bible, then you are going to take away the wrong ideas from it. If a thought, idea, ideology, or viewpoint that you come up with from reading the Bible does not look, feel, and sound like love to every single person, then that thought, idea, ideology, or viewpoint is wrong.

The temptation for everyone who reads the Bible is to use love for the foundation of their reading but only for the people who look or think like them.

It’s not a coincidence that Jesus addressed this to.

Jesus said, “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 5.43-45)

If your understanding of the Bible, if your reading of any part of the Bible, does not result in love for those who you deem your enemies, then you are reading the Bible incorrectly. Your enemies are anyone you marginalize or ostracize. Your enemies are all the people that you think are going to hell. Your enemies are anyone that you treat as less than you.

Paul picked up on this very idea of Jesus. In Romans 12, Paul summarized the love for enemies and Jesus’ sermon on the mount in his own words. Paul also told us that we are all one. There is no Jew or Greek, rich or poor, male or female in Christ.

In other words, love brings everyone together, particularly those that are deemed to be antagonistic or opposite to each other.

So, if your reading of the Bible cannot and does not result in love bringing everyone together in Christ, then you haven’t yet discovered the key to reading the Bible correctly.

Experiencing Jesus Opens the Bible: Part 1 – Drawn by the Holy Spirit

(This post is Part 1 of the series Experiencing Jesus Opens the Bible. The other posts in the series are Introduction, Part 2 – The Word of the Lord Appeared, and Part 3 – A Low Whisper, Part 4 – Seeing Jesus, and Part 5 – Knowing His Resurrection.)

In the introduction to this series, I noted that we come to the Bible with presuppositions about God. Typically, as we study the Bible, those presuppositions about God – no matter if they are right or wrong – are confirmed. However, when we truly experience the life of Jesus Christ, our presuppositions about God are challenged, overturned, changed. Then, when we go the Bible, we see this new perspective of God confirmed.

Therefore, experiencing the life of Jesus Christ opens the Bible to us.

In today’s post, I want to share with you my first experiences with the life of Jesus that, quite literally, opened the Bible to me.

I grew up in a non-religious, non-spiritual home. I vaguely remember attending a Sunday school class one time. However, I can’t recall a single conversation from my childhood that had anything to do with God, religion, faith, or spirituality.

So it might surprise you that I chose to attend a Catholic high school. But, I didn’t choose the school because it was Catholic. In fact, I chose the school in spite of it being Catholic. My reason for picking the school was that it had the best golf team in the city, and I wanted to be a professional golfer. It didn’t hurt that it was an academically challenging school as well.

Attending this Catholic high school was my first confrontation with the world of religion. I had to take religion class all four years of high school. I remember feeling picked on by the teacher in my freshman religion class – not because he was being mean to me but because he seemingly would call on me to answer every question.

We also had to attend mass several times throughout the year. I found the mass to be incredibly boring and pointless. So, I tried to get my mom to let me stay home on those days.

I remember telling classmates that all this religion stuff was not for me. I was an atheist. I didn’t believe in God. I believe in logic, facts, science, math, rational thinking. I don’t think I was ever antagonistic about it. I told my classmates I had no problem with them being religious, but it just wasn’t for me.

My mom’s parents were churchgoers, which is probably why I have that vague Sunday school memory. I remember my grandmother more than once giving me a Bible during my high school years.

One of the Bibles was from the PTL Club and Jim Baker (amazing the things that stick in our minds). That Bible sat on my shelf for years. I never once touched it. I never once opened it. I remember thinking to myself, “My grandmother is crazy. Why does she give me Bibles? Doesn’t she know that I am never going to read this thing?”

Choosing the Catholic high school for its excellent golf team paid off. I ended up going to college on a golf scholarship. A guy on the team a year ahead of me became my best friend. Both us had no problem with silence and did not need a lot of people around us. My best friend and I hung out together quite a bit. But, in my junior year, he got a girlfriend. We stopped hanging out together as much. I started to feel pretty lonely.

One December night I was lying in bed feeling particularly lonely. I wanted someone to hang out with. But, as close as I was to my teammate, I didn’t want another guy friend. I wanted a woman to be close to. However, I was introverted and shy and not comfortable striking up a conversation with anyone, especially a woman I was interested in.

So, I did something I had never done before.

I talked with God.

Well, I didn’t really talk with God. It was more like I threw him a challenge.

“God, if you exist, then I want to meet my wife for my birthday.”

That was the extent of my talk with God.

Come on God. Prove to me that you are real. Do something for me. Otherwise, I will be perfectly free to keep denying your existence.

Shortly thereafter I put a personal ad in the local paper. (Like I said, I was really uncomfortable with the idea of striking up a conversation with a woman I was interested in.) Several women answered the ad. One of the women I went on a couple of dates with. But, there was no spark, no connection.

Then, a couple of weeks before my birthday in late February, I got one last response to my ad. Her name was Dawn. We agreed to meet at the Friday’s for dinner about a block from campus.

I can still picture the table I was sitting at when Dawn walked into the restaurant. As soon as I saw Dawn walk in and I knew she was my blind date, I remember telling myself, “I am going to marry her.”

We stayed at the restaurant for hours talking. Eventually, they had to ask us to leave so they could close.

I left a message for Dawn the very next day, telling her what a great time I had and that I would like to go out again. When we finally got to talk to each other, I remember telling Dawn about that lonely night back in December when I asked God to prove that he existed by giving me my wife for my birthday. (Yes, I did that after one date. No, I have no idea what the dating rules are or how to follow them.)

Dawn responded that she was a Christian and she did not believe in coincidences. Things happened for a reason. I thought to myself that this was the end of the relationship. I want to date her. But, I am not a Christian. So, why would she want to date me?

We went out a second time pretty close to my birthday. We kept talking to each other on the phone. Dawn invited me to come to church with her. I told her that I would do that.

While I was home for spring break, I called Dawn and told her that I wanted to come to church with her that Sunday when I drove back to school. Dawn said that wasn’t a good Sunday. I told her that I really wanted to come that Sunday. She reiterated that it wasn’t a good day to come. Maybe I could come the following Sunday. I finally wore her down. I was going to church with her that Sunday.

Remember, I had basically never been to church in my life. I was from Ohio (the north) but going to school in Tennessee (the south). Dawn was African-American. She went to a Baptist church. So, here was this young white kid from the north going to church for the first time at an all black Baptist church in the south.

As we walked into the church, I noticed people were carrying tambourines with them. I remember thinking that was sort of weird. “What have I gotten myself into?”

Dawn decided that we were going to sit in the front row. The service started, and the choir paraded into the church singing. The music was loud, but really good. All of them women started dancing. Next thing I knew, women were falling to the ground. I sat there stiff as a board. Later, Dawn told me she could see the blood draining from the top of my head down my face as I turned whiter and whiter. And, she didn’t want me to come that Sunday because many of the women were coming back from a T.D. Jakes Woman Thou Art Loosed conference. Dawn knew what was going to happen and was afraid it would scare me away.

The music finally stopped. The pastor started preaching. I don’t remember a single thing he said. But, I can remember saying to myself, “How does he know that about me?” It was like everything he said was directed right at me. I didn’t know it at the time, but I was starting to experience the life of Jesus Christ.

I kept going to church every Sunday with Dawn. A few months later at the end of the school year, I wanted to join the church. But, I didn’t want to do it and then not show up for the next three months while I was back home on summer break. So, I told myself I would join the church that fall when I came back to school.

Before I left school for the summer, Dawn and I had already talked of getting married. We continued to talk about getting married after I went home for the summer. When I visited for her birthday in July, she had a pretty good idea I was bringing an engagement ring with me. I proposed and she accepted on Friday.

That Sunday we went to church. It was my first time at church since I went home for the summer. At the end of the service, the pastor did an altar call. As he normally did during the altar call, he wandered around the church singing, inviting people to have a relationship with Jesus.

Now, the pastor and I had never spoke before. So, he knew nothing about me. But, this Sunday, as he walked around the church singing, he stopped and stood right next to me. The pastor was pretty tall, and I felt him towering over me.

I had wanted to join the church several months ago, but I didn’t feel it was the right time. I was determined not to give the my life to Jesus that Sunday morning. It wasn’t the right time. I wanted to wait until fall. So, I turned in my seat so I would not have to look at the pastor.

The pastor just continued to stand there. The whole time he stood there he just kept singing the line, “Is there a better time than now?” I started crying.

He sang that line over and over again.

“Is there a better time than now?”

“Is there a better time than now?”

The more he sang that line, the more I cried.

At last, I felt my shirt lift off of my chest. To this day, I can see a hand grabbing my shirt right in the middle of my chest and pulling me out of my seat. I was determined not to get up, but this hand just lifted me right out of my seat.

I got up and gave my life to Jesus the same weekend that I got engaged to Dawn, the woman that I met just two weeks for before my birthday.

God was answering my challenge – “God, if you exist, then I want to meet my wife for my birthday.”

Dawn and I were married that December, just nine months after we met and about one year after I challenged God.

But, let’s go back to that Sunday morning I was pulled out of me seat. At the time, I did not have the language to express what happened. But, I knew beyond a doubt God had moved in my life.

I had felt the hand of God.

I had experienced God.

I felt God’s hand lift me out of my seat. I felt God’s hand pull me toward him. This was a crucial experience with God for me. Remember, I based everything on logic, facts, science, math, rational thinking. But, I could not explain this experience. Experiencing God’s hand lift me out of my seat…I could not explain away this supernatural thing that I knew had happened to me.

Prior to this experience, I had a presupposition that God was not real. He did not exist. I dared God to prove my presupposition about him wrong. And, God most certainly revealed to me that he existed. He was real. I felt his hand. I experienced him.

After this experience with the life of Jesus Christ, I had a desire to read the Bible.

The Bible.

That same book that my grandmother had given me all those years ago that I swore I would never open.

That same book that sat closed on my shelf for years.

But, I started read the book (sporadically at best). Experiencing the life of Jesus Christ opened the Bible for me. Literally.

I would never have chosen to open the Bible on my own. God did not exist. Therefore, there was no need to read a book about him.

But, my experience with the life of Jesus Christ, changed my presupposition about God. He did exist. He was real. My presupposition about God had changed, and now I went to the Bible to confirm and understand my experience that God did indeed exist. My experience with Jesus opened the Bible to me.

Over time, as I read the Bible, I developed language for my experience with the hand of God that Sunday morning.

“No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him. And I will raise him up on the last day. It is written in the Prophets, ‘And they will all be taught by God.’ Everyone who has heard and learned from the Father comes to me.” (John 6.44-45)

“It is the Spirit who gives life; the flesh is no help at all. The words that I have spoken to you are spirit and life…This is why I told you that no one can come to me unless it is granted him by the Father.” (John 6.63, 65)

“And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.” (John 12.32)

As I read the Bible, my experience with the life of Jesus Christ was confirmed. The Bible bore witness to my experience with Jesus.

From the moment I challenged God to the moment I was lifted out of my seat by his hand, Jesus was being lifted up in my heart and he was drawing me to himself. The Father who sent Jesus was drawing me. He was teaching me. I was hearing and learning from the Father in my spirit even though I was not aware of it in the flesh, in my mind. I was hearing words of spirit and life. And, it is God’s Spirit that gives life.

That Sunday morning, it was the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of God, the Spirit of Jesus Christ, drawing me out of my seat to come to the Father. His drawing me out of my seat was the culmination of what I had been hearing and learning from the Father in my spirit.

All without ever having opened the Bible.

But, experiencing the life of Jesus Christ through the drawing of the Holy Spirit changed my presuppositions about God. And, that experience with the life of Jesus Christ opened the Bible for me.

Experiencing Jesus Opens the Bible: Introduction

(This post is the Introduction to the series Experiencing Jesus Opens the Bible. The other posts in the series are Part 1 – Drawn by the Holy Spirit, Part 2 – The Word of the Lord Appeared, and Part 3 – A Low Whisper, Part 4 – Seeing Jesus, and Part 5 – Knowing His Resurrection.)

Do you know Jesus through the Bible or experience?

The Bible is an amazing book. I believe studying the Bible is important. That is why I just spent every day last year reading and writing about the Bible on this blog.

However, we often fail to recognize something very important, which is that we come to the Bible with certain presuppositions about who God is. For the most part, these presuppositions about God formed before we even knew they were forming. Forces that unknowingly form our presuppositions about God include parents, friends, pastors, churches, culture, and society. Of course, there are many more.

As we study the Bible, we think we are discovering truth. But, oftentimes, we are simply finding evidence in an inspired book that strengthens and hardens our presuppositions about God.

Why does that happen?

How do we guard against that?

What do we need to stop that from happening?

Experience.

Not any experiences.

Not all experiences.

But a certain, specific experience.

Why does the Bible strengthen and harden our presuppositions about God?

Because we have not experienced the life of Jesus Christ.

How do we guard against the Bible strengthening and hardening our presuppositions about God?

By experiencing the life of Jesus Christ.

What do we need at all times to stop the Bible from strengthening and hardening our presuppositions about God?

Experiences with the life of Jesus Christ.

I was inspired to think about this by a comment from Blaine Keller on my post “What Love Is or What Love Does?” Blaine stated how his understanding of the Bible was changing. I mentioned how I had changed by a direct encounter with Jesus. Blaine said he would love to hear about this direct encounter some time.

As I thought about the discussion with Blaine, I realized how much my experiences with the life of Jesus Christ changed my thinking. Further, I realized that in almost every case I experienced the life of Jesus in some specific way and then my thinking, particularly my presuppositions about God that I approached the Bible with, changed as a result.

At roughly the same time I was having this discussion with Blaine, I read the first blog post in a series titled “Our Need for Religious Experience” by Richard Beck. He made the connection that people, particularly younger adults, do not desire to go to church anymore because they were not having religious experiences with God there. Beck argued that the problem was not so much with the church. Rather, the problem was that we have closed ourselves off to religious experiences. I think we can extrapolate Beck’s point to Bible study as well.

People do not want to read the Bible because they have not had an experience with the life of Jesus Christ.

People read the Bible wrongly because they have closed themselves off from experiencing the life of Christ in their daily lives. It has become more or less an intellectual pursuit. Then, there is nothing standing between their presuppositions about God and the Bible. The Bible becomes their presuppositions about God.

People experience the life of Christ in their daily lives, but that experience does not line up with what they are taught about the Bible in church. So, they turn away from the Bible or want to get rid of the Old Testament because they deem it offensive to the life of Christ they are experiencing.

But, instead of not reading the Bible, using the Bible to harden and strengthen our presuppositions about God, or turning our backs on the Bible in whole or in part, we should allow our experience with the life of Christ to change our presuppositions about God that we bring to the Bible. We should allow our experience with the life of Jesus Christ to be the foundation of our belief of who God is and what God is like. When we do this, the Bible becomes an entirely different book, and we see God in the Bible in an entirely different way.

That our experience with the life of Jesus Christ changes our understanding of the Bible is found within the Bible itself.

John 5.36-40 says, “But the testimony that I have is greater than that of John. For the works that the Father has given me to accomplish, the very works that I am doing, bear witness about me that the Father has sent me. And the Father who sent me has himself borne witness about me. His voice you have never heard and his form you have never seen, and you do not have his word abiding in you, for you do not believe the one whom he has sent. You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life.”

John was the greatest person of the Old Testament. Therefore, he had the greatest testimony of the Old Testament. But, Jesus’ testimony was even greater than John’s. Jesus’ testimony, the works that he was doing, bore witness about himself and that the Father sent him.

Amazingly, Jesus, the most important person in history, didn’t write a book to reveal who God, his Father, was. He did works. He did things that could be experienced. Jesus did things that people could see, hear, and touch. Therefore, “That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our own eyes, which we have looked upon and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life – the life was made manifest, and we have seen it, and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life, which was with the Father and was made manifest to us – that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, that you may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ.” (1 John 1.1-3)

Why could the Jews Jesus was speaking to in John 5 not receive his testimony?

Because they were locked into a certain way of reading scripture formed by their presuppositions about and traditions of who God was and the messiah, Jesus Christ, would be. But, instead of looking to the scripture for eternal life (a.k.a God), Jesus told these Jews they needed to come to him. They needed to experience him, his testimony, his works. Then, these experiences of the life of Jesus Christ would change their understanding of scripture.

We read something similar in Luke 24. Two disciples were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus after Jesus was crucified. They were talking to each other about everything that had happened when a stranger asked them what they were talking about. The two disciples didn’t know it, but the stranger was Jesus.

Jesus went on to tell the two disciples that it was necessary for everything that happened to have happened. “And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he interpreted to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself.” (Luke 24.27) Even though this stranger, who was Jesus, had just explained all scripture to them in a new and different way, these two disciples still were not getting it.

What caused the stranger to be revealed?

What caused them to see Jesus?

What gave them the full understanding of what Jesus was teaching them about the scriptures?

An experience of the life of Jesus Christ.

“When he was at table with them, he took the bread and blessed and broke it and gave it to them. And their eyes were opened, and they recognized him. And he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, ‘Did not our hearts burn within us while he talked to us on the road, while he opened to us the Scriptures?'” (Luke 24.30-32)

It was when Jesus broke bread with the two disciples that they understood everything. It was then that they realized their hearts were burning within them as Jesus revealed to them the truth of scripture.

Of course, breaking bread is symbolic of the breaking of Jesus’ body, the giving of his life, for us. When we experience Jesus giving his life for us, the breaking of bread, it changes how we perceive and understand scripture. Then, our hearts begin to burn within us as we read scripture.

Burning symbolizes purification throughout the Bible. So, as we experience the life of Jesus Christ, he interprets scripture for us in a way that our hearts are purified. Therefore, the presuppositions about God that we brought to the Bible are burned away and we are left with the pure image of Jesus, and God, as the only thing that the Bible bears witness to.

Study the life of Paul and you will find the same thing. He had an experience with the life of Jesus Christ that radically changed the presuppositions about God that he brought to scripture. Paul wrote about this repeatedly in his letters, perhaps most clearly in 2 Corinthians 3 and 4.

So, over the next few posts, I will share some of my significant experiences with the life of Jesus Christ that changed the way I read and understand the Bible.